Category: marketing

Why movement matters in retail

Retail marketing assistance consultancy movement merchandising

When something moves, we pay closer attention to it.

But how stagnant is your business?

A couple of weeks ago we had a fun post on our Facebook page with those air filled stick men they often have on top of a Godfreys store denoting a ‘special event’  (yes one of many). But it doesn’t have a sign saying sale, all we know is that it signifies something going on.

5 effective ways to run a successful competition

In the last blog post I told you all of the things you shouldn’t do when running competitions on Facebook…that’s a bit unfair unless I follow up with something a bit more empowering! So here it is…

1. Decide why you’re doing it:

a.) Encourage feedback. Use your competition to get feedback on which product your audience prefers, or to find out more about what they do on the weekend for example. Choose something that will benefit your marketing.

b.) Increase your audience. Ask a question like “give us your best caption for this photo” because the more people who answer the more you’ll fall into the newsfeeds of their friends, which will likely encourage some of them to participate.

c.) Generating leads. This is all about bringing people closer to your product so they’re more likely to buy it or enter their name in a mailing list. The idea here is that you’re using a light touchpoint to encourage people to give you a more permanent way for you to stay in touch, i.e. e-mail.

d.) Capturing data. Do you already have an email list but you want to know more about your audience and their preferences? You might want to get them to update their preferences (or even just a detail like their address) as part of a competition.

e.) Changing behaviour. A competition is a great way to reward people for changing their behaviour to suit you better. For example getting people to come see you in a quiet time rather than a peak time. They may need to enter during your quiet time, but make sure you leave enough time to give them a ‘thank you’ for entering that encourages them to experience wht you have to offer.

2. Use a prize that your target audience will love.

This is pretty obvious. And if you don’t know what type of prize your audience would love more, you could give them a choice. The upside here is that you also get to know your audience better.

3. Keep things simple.

The more hoops you make someone jump through the bigger the prize needs to be. The simpler you can keep it the better.

4. Celebrate the winner!

Too often competitions don’t make a big deal out of the draw, and then people wonder if it was legitimate or not. Make a big deal out of the winner so people are more likely to enter next time.

 

5. Measure.

Will you run the competition again? It should all come down to whether or not you achieved the goals you set out for in point number 1.

Remember there are some things you shouldn’t do when running a competition. If you missed those from the last blog post you can read them here.

The recent Bonds Baby Competition is a great example of using a competition to drive you closer, much closer, to their online store where they just happened to be having a 40% off sale. To participate you had to enter your email, then verify it with a link in your inbox. This is just one example of how you can move people from strangers through to likely customers in just a few clicks.

It all comes down to experimentation, and honing in on best results.

Remember, getting more likes and reactions isn’t everything!

 

Free resources

 

What damage is your Facebook competition causing?

Last week my news feed on Facebook was clogged with ‘like and share’ competitions.

Some were great offers, but what I really wanted to see was what my friends were up to.

That moment compelled me to share these insights in to the “best practice” of Facebook competitions. Many people may simply not realise they’re breaking the rules and it’s hurting them.
If you’re a business owner and your social media people are doing these competitions, then it may be putting your whole social investment at risk.

1. Nobody likes spam.
By forcing people to share your competition, your information starts clogging up the newsfeeds of their friends who might not really appreciate it. You could actually be pushing your potential customers away and they may even click ‘hide or block’ to posts from your page. This will hurt your organic reach meaning you’ll have to rely more on paid boosting.

 

2. More ‘likes’ is about ‘vanity’
Having 10,000 or 100,000 likes on a page might look good but it doesn’t necessarily add value to you, your business or your followers. People are probably only liking your page because they want the free stuff not because they value a relationship with you. Competitions are best used when you’re gathering useful information from your followers that are most likely customers, not just quick answers from any person chasing a prize.

 

3. It’s not ethical
Shares can’t actually be seen or measured by the business holding the competition. Likes and comments are OK, and people can share and tag if they like but making a share a condition of entry isn’t truly fair because it can’t actually be checked. The only difference to this rule is that using a third party competition app actually DOES have the ability to measure shares.

 

4. It screws up the Facebook algorithm
A like and comment competition is fine. It could actually give you some great answers to a question and be a bit of fun – it’s encouraging quality conversation. However, asking people to share as a condition of entry artificially creates an influx of data to the facebook algorithm which can skew what people really want to see. Imagine if a multinational company did a ‘like and share’ competition it would lock up news feeds. Sure lots of people will see you, but will they respect you, trust you and can you sustain their interest?

 

5. What’s the punishment?
If impeding quality engagement, or having potential customers blocking you isn’t enough there’s always the chance that Facebook will dish out a direct, more obvious punishment like closing your page. Last year I saw a business who had a personal profile labelled as their business and had collected several thousand friends. This was against facebook rules and out of the blue that rule was enforced, resulting in the business losing all of those contacts overnight with no warning. You may not get punished for breaking rules immediately, but you’re taking a massive risk.

 

6. You might be breaking the actual law
Just like raffles and competitions that we see in the flesh, promotions online may also need permits. These laws change from state to state and country to country. In the online realm your competition knows no state boundaries. So just make sure you have the right permit for where ever your followers may want to enter from. For example, in Tasmania a permit is not required, but if someone in another state was to enter they’d be entering illegally because we don’t have a permit in that state.

 

Let’s make sure you’re not making any of these mistakes, and in our next edition we’ll share tips on how to run a great competition that adds true value to your business and your followers. Oh… and just in case you love reading rules, here are the promotion guidelines for Facebook.

 

To help identify your ideal target customer download a copy of our FREE Buyer Persona worksheet and think about who you’re really connecting with. Your best customer isn’t everybody. 

Buyer Persona worksheet download

 

Time for a new logo?

We all know that brand is not just a logo, but you have to admit a logo is still an important part. I see a lot of businesses change theirs as often as their cars…

So should you change yours? Here are 5 things to consider before you even start the process.

1. Why are you doing this? 
Everything about marketing is building trust and familiarity with audiences. Is there a specific reason you think you need a new logo? For example you might think your business needs a refresh. My question to you would be, “would it be better to invest in things that better the customer experience?”. Unless the experience is dead set perfect, and I bet it isn’t, then the logo isn’t where your attention should be going.

2. Does the existing logo have context? 
“Is this logo any good?” I’m often asked that question with the expectation of a ‘yes’ or ‘no’ answer. That’s impossible for me to answer properly, that question can’t be answered without knowing the context. To answer that with any level of expertise, we must first know how it needs to perform, who it needs to attract, the thoughts it needs to conjure and the values it needs to represent.

3. Better to evolve than change 
The only time I’d recommend a business do a ‘complete rebrand’ is when it was in trouble. If the last owners had built a bad reputation (in which case I hope you didn’t pay for any goodwill), or if your product has become irrelevant and you’re keeping the bones of the business but essentially building a new one.

If your business is still relevant and you just want to stay on trend, adopt the Coca-Cola method of logo change, do it softly. In such a way that the brand mark is still familiar. The only time Coca-Cola changed their logo drastically was in 1985, and that became a year of either ‘branding legend’ or ‘attention grabbing conspiracy’. If your ears have just pricked up and you’re curious… watch the video ‘The 1985 Launch of New Coke’ 

4. Test it first
Don’t ask your friends what they think, ask potential and best current customers what they think. Friends don’t know the context and probably aren’t even users of your business. Remember a good logo must attract the people who will be your best customers.

5. Do the switch properly
Depending on how drastic the logo ‘evolution’ don’t have two logos out there in the market place at the same time. It’s just confusing – it creates clutter, the complete opposite of smart marketing. If you can’t afford to make a logo change and take it across your buildings, cars, business cards, stationery, website etc. then save a bit longer. 

Related blog: ‘Your target customer is NOT everyone’